The Comeback

The fight to rebuild school communities after two years of pandemic-era uncertainty.

Nearly 17% of Memphis students in grades 3-12 performed at or above grade-level expectations in math and English
Many principals reported an uptick in school violence and disruption on a new federal survey, though a sizable portion saw no change from pre-pandemic years.
Virtual tutoring companies want to become a more permanent fixture in schools. Their impact so far is unclear.
New York City’s Class of 2022 returned to school full time after two disrupted years. Four graduating high school seniors told us about how they made it through.
Even schools that prided themselves on using restorative justice to address students’ needs struggled to pick up where they left off before the pandemic.
Districts have once again beefed up their summer programming, from credit recovery to camps focused on robotics and sports.
At the end of a third pandemic school year, teachers are beyond exhausted.
Chicago’s graduating seniors were in their sophomore year of high school when schools shuttered in 2020. They reflect here on their experiences of going to school during the COVID era.
Chicago officials said the district provided results to schools early to help plan instruction, but they are still preliminary.
Summer Connections is like a super-sized version of Denver Public Schools’ usual summer programming, paid for with federal COVID relief funds.
Scores rise across all subjects and grades, largely returning to pre-COVID levels, but disparities persist
Two Richards Career Academy cousins Chalkbeat Chicago followed through the school year graduate — and reflect on how the pandemic reshaped their post-high school plans.
Twelve Memphians are competing for seats on the school board representing districts 1, 6, 8, and 9. What questions do you have for them?
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona called for raising teacher pay in a speech Thursday.
At an event hosted by Chalkbeat and College Track, many said schools weren’t able to give students needed support.
My anxiety accompanied me back to school, making this whole school year one big transition.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
How members of Chalkbeat’s school communities will remember this rebuilding year.
An increase in the number of test-takers and a decrease in schools’ leniency could lead to more retentions.
Some blasted NYC’s move to screen all students’ social-emotional skills using an assessment called DESSA. This Brooklyn school has learned to embrace it.
The district has expanded its pool of classroom assistant subs, but the bulk of requests for backup still go unfilled.
Join Chalkbeat on June 8, 5-6:15 p.m. ET for the final event in our series on COVID and mental health.
After a year in flux, educators hope to double down on academic intervention and set firmer behavior expectations.
Anxiety, depression, and chronic absenteeism are on the rise as many students and parents struggle with school refusal after prolonged campus closures during COVID.
As connections withered, our school became every school — the faceless bureaucracy people complain about on social media and in the news.
Many schools saw an uptick in ninth graders repeating the grade this year. Now educators are trying to step in sooner to help struggling freshmen.
Some Chicago schools canceled prom last year or hosted smaller events with COVID restrictions. This spring, prom is back with a vengeance.
The district will spend COVID relief funds to rebuild five schools, renovate buildings and reopen previously closed school buildings.
School districts across the nation have reported rising chronic absenteeism this school year, as in-person schooling resumed for the first time in over a year during the pandemic.
But the district is leaving the details to schools, and not all students are getting help.
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