COVID Stimulus

Many schools are working to plug vacancies, boost student attendance, and address student mental health and academic needs this fall.
The district has spent about $156.6 million so far on payments to more than 1,000 outside vendors.
The Detroit board extended the tutoring contract with Beyond Basics, modified the student code of conduct and approved academic calendar.
Many principals say it will be very difficult to fill key support staff roles this fall, a new federal survey found.
Stimulus dollars were previously not allowed to cover teacher salaries, but officials changed their tune amid a fight over budget cuts.
“We recognize this as a challenging labor market,” the director of the Everyone Graduates Center said. “We’re not sugarcoating that.”
Some critics argue that private schools should not receive COVID relief money
To help address the exodus of women from the workforce, New York state is using federal money for a grant program to start new child care programs in areas lacking enough options.
Longtime literacy advocate Rachel Vitti left her position as a director with Beyond Basics in the wake of criticism from some education advocates
That deal would still fall short of the overall cut to school budgets, according to one analysis.
The $1.5 million investment is part of a broader pandemic-fueled effort to improve the air that Denver Public Schools students breathe.
Two parents and two teachers seek to invalidate the city budget, claiming that city officials failed to follow proper protocols before voting.
Districts’ new financial freedom could allow officials to focus more on educational priorities such as academics and teacher pay, or on reviving depleted elective programs
Virtual tutoring companies want to become a more permanent fixture in schools. Their impact so far is unclear.
Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
Indianapolis has committed COVID aid to retaining staff, academic supports, and infrastructure.
Summer Connections is like a super-sized version of Denver Public Schools’ usual summer programming, paid for with federal COVID relief funds.
Preschool enrollment in the district rose this year, but other factors will influence its long-term fate
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona called for raising teacher pay in a speech Thursday.
The district has big plans for $1.1 billion in the latest round of federal relief, but it won’t be a cure-all.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
The budget restored about $24 million in funding, including $14 million for special education following criticism from parent groups, union leaders, and elected officials.
The state began sending New York families $375 per child for food benefits, a retroactive move to cover meal costs from last summer.
Indianapolis Public Schools offered retention bonuses in late March to 3,200 eligible staff members, but they came with an attendance requirement that staff couldn’t take more than two sick days for the remainder of the semester.
This will be the third year the district will chip in for its employees’ pensions, an expense the city has previously handled.
The SEED program aims to help students who have sensory issues that are “dramatically impacting their school performance.”
The state plans to invest in child care buildings, educator training, and startup grants.
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