Coronavirus

Seniors strove to serve their community and take on leadership roles while enduring COVID’s impact on learning.
As more young children get vaccinated, Illinois will no longer require unvaccinated school and child care employees to test for COVID twice a week.
Even as New York City required students to return to in-person instruction last school year, hundreds of thousands of children missed large stretches of instruction, new figures show.
Families across the five boroughs are already mounting letter-writing campaigns and petitions for and against schools that use screens for admissions.
After hovering around 45% last spring, the average school is 39% fully vaccinated at the start of the new school year.
Beyond the typical joy and nerves among families and educators, there was a more somber reality: a majority of the city’s schools were starting the year with budget cuts.
What’s happening with the budget? How will schools address mental health? What impact will COVID have this year?
The limit on absences angered teachers in IPS worried about mandatory COVID quarantines.
Like many other states, Indiana is leaning on tutoring to help students recover from the effects of the COVID quarantines and school closures.
Masking, routine testing and other precautions will be relaxed this school year
“I’m feeling more confident that this year will be a little bit more normal.” Quarantines are gone, and a new year is beginning.
As Illinois schools open, the state has adopted recent federal public health guidelines for COVID that ease quarantines and testing of students.
City officials have not yet shared what COVID safety measures will be in place next school year or what the city’s testing strategy might be.
Illinois advocates raise concerns about low wages, lack of job security, and increased burnout for after-school workers that could lead to a staff shortage.
There is little firm evidence of an unprecedented crisis. But the ingredients are there for it to be a harder than normal year to recruit.
Student enrollment has big implications for public schools, and declines can lead to less funding and school closures or mergers.
Children First shares recommendations for city about issues like child care and public health.
More Colorado Class of 2022 students completed the FAFSA, signaling they plan on going to college. But the nation outpaced the state’s rebound.
The decision is more complicated than meets the eye, and either choice involves some trade-offs.
Stimulus dollars were previously not allowed to cover teacher salaries, but officials changed their tune amid a fight over budget cuts.
New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Boston have more small schools. A budget crunch looms.
Cities have seen a sharp decline in younger children since the pandemic hit.
Illinois children between 6 months and 5 years old are now eligible for COVID vaccinations. Will child care centers return to normal this fall?
Roughly 2,500 out of the 57,000 students enrolled in summer programs have consented to school-based COVID testing, but the district cautioned the numbers are preliminary.
The $1.5 million investment is part of a broader pandemic-fueled effort to improve the air that Denver Public Schools students breathe.
American students are slowly starting to regain academic ground lost during the pandemic. They’re still far behind.
Two parents and two teachers seek to invalidate the city budget, claiming that city officials failed to follow proper protocols before voting.
A new Colorado initiative will allow rural community colleges to share classes online.
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