This series seeks to amplify efforts to better support the wellness of students and school staff during this challenging comeback year.

Adams promised a telehealth program for all New York City high school students struggling with mental health. But officials offered few details on how it will work.
Schools are uniquely positioned to identify and support grieving children, but families and school staff say the system isn’t equipped to serve them.
Gov. Kathy Hochul’s proposals showed a deeper commitment to addressing how the pandemic impacted students both academically and mentally.
The ratio of students to counselors has reached its lowest point in 36 years, spurred both by new counselors and a nationwide decline in enrollment.
Advocates say they will push for solutions to issues that have become more pressing during the pandemic, including funding, hiring challenges, and student mental health.
These stories will take you inside the world of an exhausted social worker, a student working to come out of her shell, and a mother trying to help her son catch up.
COVID restrictions are mostly gone, but apathy and anxiety have taken their place.
School social worker Mary Difino wears many hats to meet persistent behavioral concerns and support students’ needs as Chicago recovers from COVID-related disruptions.
Republicans, who will soon have control of the House of Representatives but not the Senate, may not be willing to pay for more mental health services.
We tackle topics like consent, gender, and self-advocacy. The goal: To destigmatize difficult conversations.
School counselors say they see a spike in anxiety and depression, but there’s hope in less stigma in schools around seeking help.
Several big school districts had fewer psychologists or counselors this fall than they did before the pandemic.
More than 80% of LGBTQ students say they faced harassment or assault.
Hershey the guinea pig struggled with change. So did I.
Chalkbeat wants to hear from students, parents, and educators: What are you looking forward to this school year? What are your hopes? Concerns?
Many schools are working to plug vacancies, boost student attendance, and address student mental health and academic needs this fall.
“I’m feeling more confident that this year will be a little bit more normal.” Quarantines are gone, and a new year is beginning.
Educators say TRAILS program will help students recover from pandemic-related disruptions.
Schools need to make sure students aren’t being disciplined for behavior related to their disability, especially as the effects of the pandemic drag on, new guidance says.
Many principals reported an uptick in school violence and disruption on a new federal survey, though a sizable portion saw no change from pre-pandemic years.
New York City’s Class of 2022 returned to school full time after two disrupted years. Four graduating high school seniors told us about how they made it through.
A growing number of educators are embracing the practice, popularized by Christopher Emdin, giving students a bigger say in shaping their learning.
At an event hosted by Chalkbeat and College Track, many said schools weren’t able to give students needed support.
My anxiety accompanied me back to school, making this whole school year one big transition.
As part of a Chicago Public Schools film project, in partnership with other groups, students at four high schools seek to elevate the voices of young people.
Some blasted NYC’s move to screen all students’ social-emotional skills using an assessment called DESSA. This Brooklyn school has learned to embrace it.
Icon-heart-donate
If you value Chalkbeat, consider making a donation
Chalkbeat is a nonprofit newsroom dedicated to providing the information families and educators need, but this kind of work isn’t possible without your help.